Energize Sports Massage,14  Birnam Road, Wallasey, Wirral, CH44 9AX, Tel: 07768225580, Email: energizesportsmassage@yahoo.co.uk

Energize Sports Massage

Golf:  Is it the Most Dangerous Sport?

 The PGA may not look like it has much in common with professional rugby - but you may be surprised to learn that golfers are actually injured more often than rugby players.

It’s true.

 In fact, 62% of amateurs and 85% of professionals will sustain a significant injury associated with playing golf.

And with a staggering 60 million golfers worldwide - that’s a whole lot of people getting injured.

 The problem is, and professional golfers often overuse their muscles with frequent play and amateur golfers are usually out of shape or have poor swing mechanics,.

 Trauma to the lower back accounts for one third of all injuries and can happen to anyone regardless of age or ability.

 There are a two logical reasons for this.

 Firstly, compared to other sports, golf puts a lot of pressure on your spine. Consider the average golf swing produces a compression load on your back equal to 8 times your body weight, whereas a sport like running produces a compression load just 3 times your body weight.  

 Secondly, a good golf swing requires significant club-head speed, which is something that is only achieved by applying a lot of torque (force) and torsion (twisting) throughout your lower back

 Golfers experiencing low back pain typically have one of the following types of injuries:

  • Disc Injury
  • Altered Joint Mechanics or Motor Control
  • Degenerative Arthritis
  • Bone Fracture
  • Muscle Strain or Ligamentous Sprain

Other top golf-related injuries include trauma to the elbow, wrist/hand or shoulder. (So much for golf being a low-impact activity!)

 It’s helpful to understand not only the types of injuries associated with golf but also the main causes of injury which include:

  • Inadequate warm-up routine
  • Frequency of repetitive practice (overworked     muscles)
  • Suboptimal swing mechanics
  • Poor overall physical conditioning

With the average recovery time lasting 2-4 weeks, addressing the main causes of injury is well worth the effort.

So, the question is - How can you enjoy the wonderful game of golf while reducing your risk of injury?

The simple answer is through targeted and routine conditioning.  Golf requires strength, endurance, flexibility and explosive power in order to play the game well - and not hurt yourself in the process.

Physical conditioning routines designed specifically for golfers can help you stay on the green and out of pain.

And as a bonus, conditioning your body to avoid injury while playing golf also helps you improve your game.

An 11-week targeted conditioning program found participants:

  • Increased their clubhead speed by 7%
  • Improved their strength up to 56%
  • Improved their flexibility up to 39%
  • Increased their drive distance up to 15 yards with     sustained accuracy

Whether you’re a casual golfer or serious about your game we can help you avoid injury and improve your skills. That’s why we’d like to share with you our free informational fact sheets on Golf Injury Prevention.

These fact sheets are completely free to download and are packed full of useful information to help you reduce your risk of injury while becoming a stronger golfer.

Download them here. https://www.co-kinetic.com/landing/page?user_id=1577&campaign_id=808 

And be sure to check out our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/EnergizeSportsMassageWirral/  where we’re posting fun, informative tips and tricks to help you stay injury-free - whatever you’re doing.

Posted 2 weeks ago
<p><b>Fact: </b>It is estimated that<b> </b>between 35-43% of the UK population is
estimated to suffer from chronic pain, that’s 28 million people. It accounts
for 40% of time off work and costs the NHS over £10 billion pounds a year.</p><p><b>Fact:</b> It is estimated that 37% of the
population of developed countries and 41% of developing countries, suffer from
chronic pain.</p><p><a href="https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/6/6/e010364">https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/6/6/e010364</a></p><p>It
is one of the most common reasons why people visit a massage
therapist accounting for up to
40% of visits.</p><p>Other
common reasons include rehabbing sports injuries, relief of pain from accidents or
muscle strains, relief of stress and as a form of preventative health care. </p><p>And
also, just that good old relaxation that can only come from human touch. </p><p><b>What is massage therapy, exactly?</b></p><p>People
with specific massage therapy training will have gone to school or college and
received skilled instruction in the manual manipulation of the body’s soft
tissues, including muscles, connective tissues, tendons, and ligaments. </p><p>They
are highly knowledgeable about anatomy and physiology and are skilled
diagnosticians with regards to chronic pain and how to treat it. </p><p>The
underlying idea behind massage therapy is that a relaxed and loose muscular
structure promotes the flow of energy through the body, which enables the body
to maintain health and heal itself, without resorting to drugs or surgery.</p><p>Here
are some common massage therapy modalities that you may encounter, ranging from
simple relaxation to treatment of complex pain issues and connective tissue
realignment. </p><p><b>Swedish Massage</b></p><p>This
is your standard relaxation massage. Swedish massage is very popular in spa
settings. </p><p>As
one of the most popular types of bodywork performed today, the overarching goal
of Swedish massage is the ultimate relaxation of the entire body. It is
exceptional at achieving this, easing tension while promoting the release of
environmental toxins stored in the body’s fat and epidermis layers while
simultaneously increasing the oxygen levels in the blood.</p><p>Swedish
massage has also been shown to produce significant reductions in the stress
hormone, cortisol. </p><p><b>Trigger Point Therapy and Myofascial Release</b></p><p>A
trigger point is a small area of tightly bound and ‘knotted’ muscle that will
produce referred pain into another part of the body when pressed upon. For
example, a trigger point in the rhomboid muscle in the upper back can produce
headache-like pain at the base of the skull. </p><p>Trigger
points such as these are often misdiagnosed as migraines.</p><p>Trigger
points range in severity from mildly annoying to completely debilitative. The
affected muscle fibres are in a permanently shortened and tense state, and can
even pinch nearby nerves, producing even more related symptoms, sometimes
spiraling into full-blown fibromyalgia, a disorder of the connective tissues. </p><p>This
is one area where massage therapy has a distinct advantage over every other
form of treatment. Conventional medicine’s answer to trigger points is usually
an injection of a local anesthetic or a corticosteroid injection. Both of which
are temporary, unnatural treatments and in the case of the corticosteroid,
actually damaging to the tissues. </p><p>Massage
therapy treats these by the application of pressure directly to the trigger
point, going over time from light to very deep, (usually within the same
session) whereupon the trigger point will begin to release and relax. </p><p>Follow-up
treatment is nearly always needed to retrain the muscle fibers to lengthen and “smooth”
back out. A good massage therapist can often boast a near 100% success rate
with trigger point therapy, even when other treatments have failed. </p><p><i>Myofascial release</i> is a broader application
of this type of therapy that seeks to restore mobility and function to the
body’s underlying network of connective tissue that is present in every muscle
in the body. It improves lymph circulation (keeping the blood clean) and
enhances the muscle’s natural stretch reflex, keeping the body supple and
strong. </p><p>It
should be noted that these types of massage therapy are not the same as a
relaxing Swedish massage and can sometimes be quite painful as the body relaxes,
releases, and returns to normal homeostasis. It’s important to communicate to
us during your treatment if you are uncomfortable at any time.</p><p>Both
of these modalities are often incorporated into sports massage along with other
techniques such as muscle energy (a form of assisted stretching).</p><p><b>Sports Massage</b></p><p>The
term sports massage implies the focus is just on the athletic population. From
the highest level of competition, to the casual weekend warrior, sports massage
therapists can be found everywhere from weekend 5ks to professional locker
rooms and Olympic fields. </p><p>However
over time it has also become known among the general public as an alternative
name for a deep tissue massage. Its benefits are not just for the athletic
population and it has great value for people with occupational induced injuries
and conditions. This may be due to repetitive strain or poor posture induced by
working conditions (sitting at a computer for hours or driving long distances).</p><p>For
the athlete sports massage focuses on both pre- and post- event training and
recovery. </p><p>Pre-
event for example, may involve stimulating a stretch reflex in the quadriceps
muscle of a runner to help lengthen her stride, with repeated treatments
resulting in a faster runner who is less prone to injury. </p><p>Post-event
can take the form of a light, relaxing massage to stimulate healing blood flow
to an overused muscle group, enabling the athlete to recover safer and faster,
and enable them to perform at the top of their game sooner than otherwise would
be the case. </p><p>Rather
than a specific technique as in trigger point or myofascial therapies, sport
massage focuses on the dual goals of athletic performance and recovery and may
borrow heavily on other modalities to achieve these ends. </p><p><b>The tip of the proverbial iceberg…</b></p><p>The
above is by no means a comprehensive list of massage therapy modalities. There
are literally dozens of different types of massage, used in everything from
lymphatic drainage, body realignment, even neuromuscular therapy that seeks to
balance the nervous system.</p>

Fact: It is estimated that between 35-43% of the UK population is estimated to suffer from chronic pain, that’s 28 million people. It accounts for 40% of time off work and costs the NHS over £10 billion pounds a year.

Fact: It is estimated that 37% of the population of developed countries and 41% of developing countries, suffer from chronic pain.

https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/6/6/e010364

It is one of the most common reasons why people visit a massage therapist accounting for up to 40% of visits.

Other common reasons include rehabbing sports injuries, relief of pain from accidents or muscle strains, relief of stress and as a form of preventative health care.

And also, just that good old relaxation that can only come from human touch.

What is massage therapy, exactly?

People with specific massage therapy training will have gone to school or college and received skilled instruction in the manual manipulation of the body’s soft tissues, including muscles, connective tissues, tendons, and ligaments.

They are highly knowledgeable about anatomy and physiology and are skilled diagnosticians with regards to chronic pain and how to treat it.

The underlying idea behind massage therapy is that a relaxed and loose muscular structure promotes the flow of energy through the body, which enables the body to maintain health and heal itself, without resorting to drugs or surgery.

Here are some common massage therapy modalities that you may encounter, ranging from simple relaxation to treatment of complex pain issues and connective tissue realignment.

Swedish Massage

This is your standard relaxation massage. Swedish massage is very popular in spa settings.

As one of the most popular types of bodywork performed today, the overarching goal of Swedish massage is the ultimate relaxation of the entire body. It is exceptional at achieving this, easing tension while promoting the release of environmental toxins stored in the body’s fat and epidermis layers while simultaneously increasing the oxygen levels in the blood.

Swedish massage has also been shown to produce significant reductions in the stress hormone, cortisol.

Trigger Point Therapy and Myofascial Release

A trigger point is a small area of tightly bound and ‘knotted’ muscle that will produce referred pain into another part of the body when pressed upon. For example, a trigger point in the rhomboid muscle in the upper back can produce headache-like pain at the base of the skull.

Trigger points such as these are often misdiagnosed as migraines.

Trigger points range in severity from mildly annoying to completely debilitative. The affected muscle fibres are in a permanently shortened and tense state, and can even pinch nearby nerves, producing even more related symptoms, sometimes spiraling into full-blown fibromyalgia, a disorder of the connective tissues.

This is one area where massage therapy has a distinct advantage over every other form of treatment. Conventional medicine’s answer to trigger points is usually an injection of a local anesthetic or a corticosteroid injection. Both of which are temporary, unnatural treatments and in the case of the corticosteroid, actually damaging to the tissues.

Massage therapy treats these by the application of pressure directly to the trigger point, going over time from light to very deep, (usually within the same session) whereupon the trigger point will begin to release and relax.

Follow-up treatment is nearly always needed to retrain the muscle fibers to lengthen and “smooth” back out. A good massage therapist can often boast a near 100% success rate with trigger point therapy, even when other treatments have failed.

Myofascial release is a broader application of this type of therapy that seeks to restore mobility and function to the body’s underlying network of connective tissue that is present in every muscle in the body. It improves lymph circulation (keeping the blood clean) and enhances the muscle’s natural stretch reflex, keeping the body supple and strong.

It should be noted that these types of massage therapy are not the same as a relaxing Swedish massage and can sometimes be quite painful as the body relaxes, releases, and returns to normal homeostasis. It’s important to communicate to us during your treatment if you are uncomfortable at any time.

Both of these modalities are often incorporated into sports massage along with other techniques such as muscle energy (a form of assisted stretching).

Sports Massage

The term sports massage implies the focus is just on the athletic population. From the highest level of competition, to the casual weekend warrior, sports massage therapists can be found everywhere from weekend 5ks to professional locker rooms and Olympic fields.

However over time it has also become known among the general public as an alternative name for a deep tissue massage. Its benefits are not just for the athletic population and it has great value for people with occupational induced injuries and conditions. This may be due to repetitive strain or poor posture induced by working conditions (sitting at a computer for hours or driving long distances).

For the athlete sports massage focuses on both pre- and post- event training and recovery.

Pre- event for example, may involve stimulating a stretch reflex in the quadriceps muscle of a runner to help lengthen her stride, with repeated treatments resulting in a faster runner who is less prone to injury.

Post-event can take the form of a light, relaxing massage to stimulate healing blood flow to an overused muscle group, enabling the athlete to recover safer and faster, and enable them to perform at the top of their game sooner than otherwise would be the case.

Rather than a specific technique as in trigger point or myofascial therapies, sport massage focuses on the dual goals of athletic performance and recovery and may borrow heavily on other modalities to achieve these ends.

The tip of the proverbial iceberg…

The above is by no means a comprehensive list of massage therapy modalities. There are literally dozens of different types of massage, used in everything from lymphatic drainage, body realignment, even neuromuscular therapy that seeks to balance the nervous system.

Posted 6 weeks ago

Hamstring Strains in Soccer Video

Posted 8 weeks ago

(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6Djv9U3jiI)

Posted 8 weeks ago

FIFA World Cup Fever

image

From the die-hard supporters, to devoted players, and little dreamers in the backyard – it’s unlikely that you’ll manage to escape the craze that comes with the FIFA World Cup. Even if you’re not normally a football fan, you’ll probably find yourself drawn into watching a few matches as the madness starts to engulf us.

 Football has the power to bring the proverbial pauper and king together. Like the Olympic games, it is a human experience that can bring races, religions, cultures and nationalities together with no other commonality than the joy of a shared experience.

 Football is an international language. According to Babbel, 1.5 billion people speak English (20% of the world’s population) and according to FIFA, 270 million people play association football (4% of the world’s population). But if you take into account the casual kick arounds in the parks, or on the dusty patches Africa’s huge continent, or in town squares pretty much anywhere in the world, the number is likely to dwarf the number of English speakers in the world. EVERYONE can kick a ball around for free, which makes it a powerful force for change throughout the world.

 Here are a few injury facts and figures that you can drop into conversation during this month’s World Cup.

1) Apart from concussions, nearly 83% of injuries occur to the lower limb, most commonly the ankle in men and the knee in women

 2} Nearly a quarter of all injuries are caused by tackling

3] Midfielders are most at risk experiencing nearly 40% of all the injuries on a pitch Muscle strains to the thigh – most frequently the hamstring muscle are in the top three injuries. {This is often a consequence of tight hip flexors in amateur players in my experience.)

4} Muscle injuries are often associated with a burst of acceleration/sprinting, sudden stopping, lunging, sliding (over stretching the muscle) or a high kick. Whereas ankle and knee injuries, where ligaments are strained, occur with cutting, twisting, jumping, changing direction and contact/tackling

·5} Groin pain is also a common complaint and may be due to poor kicking technique as well as weakness in the core and pelvis – 1 in 5 players will experience a groin injury in a season

· 6} And 40% of those groin injuries will cause a player to have to take more than 28 days off from play 

We’ve put together six printable/downloadable advice sheets on the most common soccer injuries, and how to both prevent and treat them so next time someone walks through the door with an injury, you can be ready to tackle their injury head on.

image

 You can download the leaflets here, 

https://www.co-kinetic.com/landing/page?user_id=1577&campaign_id=781

 In most cases an underlying weakness or imbalance in the muscles of the leg, core and pelvis is the cause of many injuries. In fact your physical fitness is the single most important factor in preventing soccer injuries.

 Neuromuscular training for the knee can reduce the incidence of series knee injuries by 3.5 times

· A 3 x a week pre-season proprioceptive training programme resulted in a 7 x decrease in ACL injury and an 87% reduction in the risk of suffering an ankle sprain

·A strength training programme can reduce the incidence of injuries by nearly half (47%) compared to soccer players who did no additional strength training.

 If you want to understand more about any of these aspects then come and talk to us. A good training programme incorporating both strength and neuromuscular/proprioceptive training can go a very long way to helping you prevent an injury occurring in the first place.

Ticking all the right boxes and taking the right preparation will greatly reduce the chance of ijury but if obviously they still occur. So if you need help in tr.eating an injury or want to take steps in injury prevention I can help. I will assess range of motion and excess muscle tone and take steps offload the effects of games and training. 

If you’ve suffered from a soccer injury or your kids, family or friends have suffered from one, go and check out our downloadable leaflets at this link

https://www.co-kinetic.com/landing/page?user_id=1577&campaign_id=781&custom_page=https://landing.co-kinetic.com/soccerhandouts&thank_display=true

And be sure to check out our Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/EnergizeSportsMassageWirral where we’re posting some World Cup-special posts packed with fun and informative tips and tricks to help you stay safe on the football pitch.

Posted 17 weeks ago

Video 3 The Long Term Consequences of Shoulder Impingement

Posted 18 weeks ago

Don’t Run into Trouble Running Injuries Explainer Video

Posted 18 weeks ago

12 Running Tips

Posted 20 weeks ago

Low Back Pain Explainer Video

Check out my website @ www.energize-sportsmassage.co.uk

Posted 24 weeks ago

Run: Better, Faster, Longer, Stronger

Do you dream of being that runner where every step of every mile is 100% pain free? No aches, no twinges or niggles, no lingering soreness from yesterday’s session. Well, you are not alone; research shows that as many as 79% of runners get injured at least once during the year. Stop. Think about that number for a moment; nearly 8 out of every 10 runners you see at your next race have been or will be injured sometime that year.

Think of running pains in terms of a spectrum. At one end you have severe, full-blown injuries, we’ll name that the red zone, which includes stress fractures that require time off. The other end, where you’re in top form, is the green zone. Mild, transient aches that bug you one day and disappear the next sit closer to the green end. Unfortunately, many runners get stuck in the middle, in the not-quite-injured but not-quite-healthy yellow zone. Your ability to stay in the green zone depends largely on how you react to that first stab of pain. Often a little rest now, or reduction in training mileage and intensity, with some treatment, can prevent a lot of time off later. Developing a proactive long-term injury-prevention strategy, such as strength training, stretching, regular massage and foam-rolling can help keep you in the ‘green.’ Physical therapy is a lot like homework, not all of us like having to do it, but if you don’t do it, you’re sure to get in trouble at some stage! You can find more information and exercise leaflets for injury prevention at this link.

https://www.co-kinetic.com/landing/page?user_id=1577&campaign_id=744

So, What Causes Running Injuries?

 There are a lot of theories as to what causes running injury but it seems the answer is obvious: running! Research has stated that “running practice is a necessary cause for RRI (Running Related Injury) and, in fact, the only necessary cause.” With running being the key risk factor for running injuries what other factors influence risk? Historically a lot of emphasis was placed on intrinsic factors like leg length discrepancy, pronation (flat foot), high arches, genu valgus/varum (knock knee or bow legged) and extrinsic factors like ‘special’ running shoes being stability shoes or anti-pronation shoes, lack of stretching. However, recent studies have shown there is no one specific risk factor that has a direct cause-effect relationship with injury rate or injury prevention. Whilst warming up, compression garments, acupuncture and massage have some evidence in reducing injury rates it is all a little grey. Leaving you with a multifactorial buffet of probable contributing causes to running injuries.

 There is however one specific factor that has been proven, and that is training error. Estimates suggest that anywhere from 60 to as much as 80% of running injuries are due to training errors. Runners become injured when they exceed their tissues capacity to tolerate load. A combination of overloading with inadequate recovery time. Poorly perfused tissues, such as ligaments, tendons and cartilage, are particularly at risk because they adapt more slowly than muscles to increased mechanical load. It’s a question of balancing training load and recovery. The training load has to be offloaded with massage, foam rolling, dry needling and stretching etc.

Factors that affect how much training load a runner can tolerate before injury will also have a role. There are 2 key factors that appear to play a part in this – Body Mass Index (BMI > 25) and history of previous injury, especially in the last 12 months. While high BMI and previous injury may reduce the amount of running your body can manage, strength and conditioning is likely to increase it. There is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of strength training to reduce injury risk and improve performance. Training error and injury risk share a complex relationship - it may not be that total running mileage on its own is key but how quickly this increases, hill and speed training. The old saying of “too much, too soon” is probably quite accurate. Injury prevention is really a ‘mirror image’ of the causes of an injury. So, if you understand the primary reasons for getting injured then you are heading in the right direction to staying healthy this running season. You can find out more on injury prevention, with recommended exercise leaflets, at the following link.  

 We have produced a series of prevention and treatment guides for the 6 most common running injuries which you can download here.  Dont Run into Trouble

https://www.co-kinetic.com/landing/page?user_id=1577&campaign_id=744

 What are The Most Common Injuries to be Aware of?

Body tissues such as muscles and tendons are continuously stressed and repaired on a daily basis, as a result of both ‘normal’ functional activities and sport. An overuse injury often occurs when a specific tissue fails to repair in the time available, begins to breakdown initially at microscopic level and then over time develops into a true injury. So, the first time you feel a soreness, a stiffness or a pain is not necessarily when it all began.

 The most common injury is ‘runners knee’ or patellofemoral pain syndrome and accounts for over 40% of running injuries. This is followed closely by plantar fasciitis, achilles tendinopathy and then ITB (iliotibial band syndrome), shin splints and hamstring strain. These injuries generally need complete rest or at least a reduction in training volume and intensity. Followed by soft tissue therapy to promote tissue healing and mobility. Although these are overuse injuries there is frequently an underlying muscle weakness and/or flexibility issue that needs to be addressed with specific rehabilitation exercises. Follow this link to find more specific information about each of the most common running injuries with specific rehabilitation leaflets for you to use.

 You can find our prevention and treatment guides for the following running injuries at this link:  Dont Run into Trouble

https://www.co-kinetic.com/landing/page?user_id=1577&campaign_id=744


  • ·         Medial tibial stress syndrome (shin splints)
  • ·         Patellofemoral pain (runner’s knee)
  • ·         Achilles tendinopathy
  • ·         Plantar fasciitis
  • ·         Hamstring strains
  • ·         Iliotibial band syndrome                                                                                                                                                                                     While guidance can be given, it is general in its nature, whereas individual complaints may need individual attention. If you do pick up an injury (including 'tightness’ 'irritation’ or 'niggle’) that you’re worried about then we can help, the sooner it’s treated the better.

For help with injuries contact Larry Howard at Energize Sports Massage

Web: www.energize-sportsmassage.co.uk

Tel: 07768225580. Email: energizesportsmassage@yahoo.co.uk

 The sports massage techniques used in treatment may include deep tissue massage, trigger point therapy, myofascial release and kinesiology taping.

Posted 24 weeks ago